Install Linux kernel 4.10.1 in Ubuntu and Linux Mint

Linux kernel 4.10.1 was , and now you can install it on your Ubuntu or Linux Mint computer.

Here’s how to install kernel 4.10.1 courtesy of (note that there are separate instructions for 32-bit and 64-bit systems):

How to install Kernel 4.10.x on 32 bit Ubuntu and derivative systems:

Download the needed packages:

cd /tmp

wget

kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.10.1/linux-headers-4.10.1-041001_4.10.1-041001.201702260735_all.deb

kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.10.1/linux-headers-4.10.1-041001-generic_4.10.1-041001.201702260735_i386.deb

kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.10.1/linux-image-4.10.1-041001-generic_4.10.1-041001.201702260735_i386.deb

Install the Kernel:

sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.10.deb linux-image-4.10.deb

How to install Kernel 4.10.x on 64 bit Ubuntu and derivative systems:

Download the needed packages:

cd /tmp

wget

kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.10.1/linux-headers-4.10.1-041001_4.10.1-041001.201702260735_all.deb

kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.10.1/linux-headers-4.10.1-041001-generic_4.10.1-041001.201702260735_amd64.deb

kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/v4.10.1/linux-image-4.10.1-041001-generic_4.10.1-041001.201702260735_amd64.deb

Install the Kernel:

sudo dpkg -i linux-headers-4.10.deb linux-image-4.10.deb

If you run into any problems, the Geekster article also has instructions on how to remove Linux kernel 4.10.1.

Best Linux distros for older laptops

It’s really true that there is a Linux distribution out there for everybody, including the folks who are using older computers. A writer at Datamation has a helpful roundup of the best Linux distros for older laptops.

Should Chrome OS merge with Android?

There’s been quite a lot of hype about Chrome OS possibly merging with Android. But one writer at TechRepublic isn’t so sure that merging the two operating systems is a good idea.

Jack Wallen reports for TechRepublic:

Lately I’ve been giving this question quite a bit of thought. I depend on both Chrome OS and Android. I use them throughout every day and would find my process a bit more challenging without them. When it was first announced that Chrome OS would be able to run Android apps, my initial thoughts were positive; I considered this move by Google to be the most logical step forward. It was clearly the best way to compete with the Microsoft Surface and to bring more users into the fold.

No matter how hard I try, I cannot find Android apps for Chrome OS that are more productive than the apps Chrome OS already works with. Sure I could install WPS Office, but I already have Google Docs. Yes, I can install K-9 email, but I already have Inbox (as well as web mail for my own domain accounts). Many of the other apps I run on Android (such as Buffer, Facebook, Twitter, Keep, Dropbox, etc.) I already use in web form on Chrome OS (some of which open spectacularly in an app window, so they look and feel like standard apps). If you’re an MS Office user, you can use that ecosystem via Chrome, so there’s no need for an app. And so, again, I ask myself, “Why?”

In the end, if Google is actually planning to merge Chrome OS and Android, they will come to understand that it will make the platform less efficient and users will still see those devices (the Chromebook and the smartphone) as two distinct tools with two distinct purposes. Combining those devices and purposes will distract from what makes ChromeOS and Chromebooks so special: elegant and efficient simplicity.

ChromeOS may not be the platform for you, but for those who have grown to depend upon the highly productive ecosystem, the idea of muddying those waters with a layer of Android might be cause for concern.

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