As a senior technical director at Primitive Logic, I have the happy privilege of working with a large variety of technologies. While I am still very hands-on, I almost always have people on my project teams who who are deeper on the specific vendor platform on whom I rely to keep me honest when working with clients to set project expectations.

I have lead multiple initiatives involving Salesforce (I have reached the level of Ranger on in my spare time) so the skepticism of my lead developer when the sponsor of a recent project asked us to implement a Salesforce community with no custom code matched my expectations, too. Neither of us had ever been on a project where there was not a serious amount of custom development using Apex and JavaScript, frequently with the need for custom HTML for the UI.

Still, it was an interesting challenge and we assured the client that we would make every effort to fulfill requirements with as little custom development as possible.

A good chunk of my career has been devoted to working with flexible platforms like Salesforce; i.e., vendor products and services that provide a set of out-of-the-box features coupled with APIs for extending functionality with custom development. I have learned that the amount of custom development necessary to meet business requirements is influenced by more factors than what the product provides by default.