After Congress , new Federal Communications Commission chairman Ajit Pai promised that the personal information they give to their ISPs would continue to be, well, private. Indeed, Pai said that he planned to work with the Federal Trade Commission to police ISPs around privacy issues.

However, many believe that this will not only fail to provide effective broadband privacy protections, but will also come at the cost of . As you may recall, net neutrality prohibits ISPs like Verizon and Comcast from picking winners and losers on the open internet. Indeed, we could be heading for a day where the FTC actually won’t be able to regulate ISPs at all.

At the end of the day, these changes are really about placing trust in the government and the ISPs that they won’t deny or throttle specific internet services, including cloud services, over others. It’s also about placing trust that our use of cloud services or other internet services won’t be monitored for whatever reason. Just trust us, right? 

As cloud computing moves toward a trillion-dollar market, we are facing the fact that the open internet is how these cloud services get to users. They typically flow through an ISP, and that ISP’s ability to deal with those services equally is important to enterprises, not only in the United States but all over the world.