Heads up, those of you who had problems with last week’s , which clobbered Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 and CRM 2013 OnPremises reports; Telerik RadListBox and RadWindow controls; and various IE compatibility modes. A slew of patches appeared late last night, but it’s still too early to tell if they’re effective in resolving all those reported ills.

I counted four new patches. As of early Thursday morning, three of them are documented.

  • is a new cumulative update for Windows 10 Anniversary Update, bringing version 1607 up to build 14393.970. Yes, that’s the third cumulative update for version 1607 in the past eight days.
  • is likely a new, as-yet-undocumented cumulative update for Win10 November Update, version 1511. (I’m guessing at the KB number because it falls between the KB for 1607 and the one for 1507.)  doesn’t yet list a new build number.
  •  is a new cumulative update for the original release of Win10, commonly called 1507. This brings the build number up to 10240.1732.
  • is a patch for Internet Explorer 11 that fixes the bugs in last week’s /KB 4012204 security patch. The KB article for 4016446 explains:

Forms in Microsoft Dynamics CRM 2011 are not displayed correctly after KB 4013073 is installed on a Windows system that is running Internet Explorer 11… This update is required only if you are experiencing the symptoms that are described in the “Symptoms” section, and you have cumulative security update 4013073 installed on Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2012 R2, Windows 7 SP1, or Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1.

Still have your scorecards handy? The above-mentioned  is an umbrella patch that included—among others—KB 4012204 (the March cumulative IE update), KB 4012215 (the Win7 Security Monthly Quality Rollup), and KB 4012216 (the Win8.1 Monthly Rollup).

All of those patches have been implicated in the rendering problems with Microsoft’s Dynamics CRM 2011 and CRM 2013 OnPremises reports, broken Telerik controls, IE compatibility mode problems, and heaven knows what else.

on the subject had a post Wednesday evening that pointed to the Win10 1607 patch KB 4016635. I’ve haven’t seen any confirmation that the patch works and—perhaps more important—there’s no advice on whether users who manually altered their CSS files to dodge Microsoft’s bug need to remove the workarounds.

A note from the peanut gallery: At what point do rapid-fire cumulative updates start looking like emergency hotfixes? Three cumulative updates to Microsoft’s flagship operating system in eight days doesn’t engender confidence as a service.

Look for the latest on the .